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TM 1-1500-204-23-3 NOTE When water is noted in fuel sumps, continue to drain fuel until water is no longer evident in drained fuel. d. Fuel  Strainers.    Fuel  strainers  remove  dirt,  water,  and  other  foreign  particles  from  the  fuel.    They  are  usually located in the fuel tank outlets or as part of the auxiliary pump assembly.  They are also installed in carburetors and other fuel-metering units. (1) Types.    Fuel  tank,  fuel  sump,  and  carburetor/fuel  metering  strainers  are  the  types  explained  below. Various types are also shown in figure 2-6. (a) Fuel  tank.    Fuel  tank  strainers  have  a  comparatively  coarse  mesh  to  prevent  large  particles  from entering the fuel system. (b) Fuel sump.    Fuel  sump  strainers  are  located  at  a  low  point  between  the  fuel  tank  and  the  engine- driven pump.  The mesh size is finer, usually being 40 or more mesh per inch. (c) Carburetor/fuel  metering.    Carburetors  and  other  fuel-metering  devices  have  screens  or  sintered metal filters.  These are usually designed to remove all particles larger than 40 microns. (2) Maintenance.    Fuel  strainer  removal,  inspection,  cleaning,  and  replacement  should  be  accomplished  in accordance   with   the   applicable   aircraft   maintenance   manual.      General   procedures   are   covered   in   the   following paragraphs. (a) Removal.    Remove  strainer  in  accordance  with  aircraft  maintenance  manual  making  sure  to  place the fuel selector valve in the off position prior to removal. (b) Inspection.    Inspect  strainer  for  dents,  tears,  clogging,  foreign  particles,  and  separation  of  solder joints.  Inspect body and cap for cracks or other damage.  Replace strainer if punctured. WARNING · Drycleaning  solvent  is  flammable  and  solvent  vapors  are  toxic.    Use  P-D-680,  Type  II Solvent in a well-ventilated area.  Keep away from open flames.  Avoid prolonged solvent contact with skin. · When using air pressure, be extremely careful.  Do not blow stream of air toward yourself or any other  person.    Users  of  air  pressure  and  personnel  within  the  immediate  area  shall  wear  safety glasses,  goggles,  or  face  shield.    Ear  protection  may  be  required.    Pressure  will  not  exceed  30 psig.  Failure to comply may result in injury. (c) Cleaning.    Clean  strainers  with  dry-cleaning  solvent  P-D-680,  Type  II.    Blow  dry  with  filtered,  low pressure, compressed air. (d) Replacement.  Replace strainer in accordance with applicable aircraft maintenance manual. e. Float  Switches.    Float  switches  are  used  to  illuminate  caution  lights  located  on  the  cockpit  instrument  panel. Illumination usually occurs when the fuel level falls below a certain point.  A typical float switch unit is shown in figure 2- 7.  Inspect switch for cracks, damage, corrosion, and security.  Replace if damage exceeds inspection requirements in the applicable maintenance manual. f. Fuel  Cells  and  Tanks.    Fuel  Cell  and  tank  types,  inspection,  maintenance,  purging,  preservation  handling, storage, and depreservation are described in the following paragraphs. (1) Types.  There are two basic fuel cell and tank types.  These types are the fuel cell and the integral fuel tank. (a) Integral.    Integral  tanks  are  compartments  of  the  structure  of  an  aircraft  (as  shown  in  figure  2-8) designed to contain fuel.  They are manufactured with a liquid-tight boundary, commonly called a seal plane, which has been sealed with gaskets, structural adhesives, elastic films or other sealants.  They have been built into both the wing and fuselage sections of the aircraft with the primary structure forming the boundaries of the fuel tanks. 2-9

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